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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 7
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 1:30am PST
social civil rights type cases like roe v. wade or brown v.s. board of education? and i think nobody knows. >> how much attention do you think they give to that, to public opinion? where the public stands on an issue? and growing sentiment? >> it's a great question. i mean, if you look at the evolving public opinion on this, there were polls in 2004 that were taken by gallup and "washington post" and other people that showed about 60% of the public opposed same-sex marria marriage. gallup had a poll out that showed 53% support and about 40% oppose. there are measures on state ballots around the country last month, and all for of them, the same-sex marriage side won. so the justices can see the trend. in that gallup poll, more than 70% of young people support same-sex marriage. the question is, do they see themselves stopping something they think is moving too fast? or do they want to make sure they're not behind the curve of history? >> well, it's clear that the people that were against gay marriage, they were happy about this today. even though it does have the potential for creatin
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 5:00pm PST
groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairman of the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownership rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 6:00pm PST
johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing l
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 3:00pm PST
weekend in civil disobedience training. now, for more on the behind-the- scenes debate over right to work, we're joined by michigan congressman sander levin, a democrat. he met today with governor snyder and with the president. and republican state senator john prose, who is one of the sponsors of right-to-work legislation. representative levin, i want to start with you because you met with two of the key people who who have been debating this today, governor snyder, president obama. what were you there to say? >> to say this is a very divisive effort. michigan is already open for business. we added 30,000 auto jobs since the recession began. already we're growing. this would terribly disrupt the pattern of labor-management relations that has really evolved very effectively for the last decade-and-a-half. it's deeply divisive. secondly i want the record to be very clear. there is no requirement today that people pay union dues or belong to a union. what the law says is this. if a majority of employees vote to be represented, if they decide to do that and if the employer decides to agree t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)